Happy Valentimes!

Lazy cupcakes here folks. I bought the Duncan Hines Red Velvet box mix, which turns your tongue, teeth and fingers red. I mixed up 1 pkg cream cheese, 1 c. sugar, 1 egg and 1/2 bag mini chocolate chips. Set it aside, mix up cake batter according to box, fill cups 2/3 full, drop a dollop of the cream cheese mixture in the center (or try, like I did, to make hearts, it didn't work out so well). Bake for 25 minutes. Sweet!


i heart brownie edges

this is brilliant!

I was just asking myself the same thing...

This was the cover of the Oregonian's FoodDay on Tuesday. I've been wondering the same thing myself (and had guessed/hoped it was pie). Layer cake and Madeleines? I dunno. I do know that when I started this blog I did it out of my love of baking and requests from friends to make my recipes accessible. I've loved cupcakes since childhood and always preferred making them over making a big layer cake, for special occasions and whatnot. But I'm a little burnt out. I'm sure you've noticed, as I seem to post more about baking-related things rather than baking myself. I have a few recipes up my sleeve that I want to test out. And I'm by no means quitting, but I may start blogging about baking things other than cupcakes. Whaddya think?

I thought this was the best part of the Oregonian article:

Five recent baking obsessions

Muffins: A staple of early 1990s coffee breaks with wide-ranging variations, from super-sized cakey monstrosities from warehouse stores, to pop-in-your-mouth mini sizes. Their popularity made big sellers out of special pans producing just the muffin tops.

Bagels: Though frozen bagels had been widely available since the 1970s, they reached critical mass only in the mid-'90s, when chains like Noah's and Einstein Bros. made freshly baked varieties widely available. Sales dropped significantly in 2002, as low-carb dieting became a national obsession.

Scones: Starbucks is directly responsible for the ultra-sweet updating on this Scottish biscuit. In the late '90s, the coffee giant began filling its bakery cases with dense cookielike pastries filled with cranberries, blueberries, nuts and what-have-you. These days, they're touting "healthy" multigrain versions with zero grams trans fat. Not surprisingly, they aren't very good.

Doughnuts: Oddly, while Americans were shunning bagels during the Atkins era, we were also obsessing about sugar-glazed rings from Krispy Kreme. When outlets arrived in Oregon in 2003, customers lined up for hours for the sweet treats. Interest waned in 2005 as the brand's cult following faded. In the end, it was a very good doughnut, but it was still just a doughnut.

Cupcakes: The recent return of these staples of the '60s and '70s inspired best-selling cookbooks, specialized baking equipment, even the popular blog Cupcakes Take the Cake on the Internet (http://cupcakestakethecake.blogspot.com). The resurgence gave legions of home cooks new uses for all those muffin pans they bought in the '90s.

-- Grant Butler